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  1. Video post

    James Dean washing his Porsche Speedster, photographed by Sanford Roth.

    (Source: jamesdeandaily)

    Notes: 3,928 notes

    Reblogged from: desiarnaz

  2. Photo post

    Two Navajo Code Talkers died this past week, according to the tribal government and family members.
Guy Clauschee, 87, died early Thursday morning, September 11, 2014, in Fort Defiance. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Monday at the Fort Defiance Presbyterian Church.

A Code Talker throughout most of World War II, Clauschee came back from the war and continued his education at the Ganado Mission. After graduating in 1950, he moved to Window Rock and started work with the Bureau of indian Affairs as a facilities management foreman. He retired after 40 years.

On Wednesday, September 10, 2014, tribal officials reported the death of another Navajo Code Talker, Robert Walley Sr., 93.

Walley served as a Code Talker from 1943 to 1945, during which he received a Purple Heart. He served in the 6th Marine Division and was a Marine Raider who fought in the Battle of Bougainville, Guam, Okinawa and the occupation of Emirau Island.

Both Walley and Clauschee received Congressional Silver Medals for their service as Navajo Code Talkers.

According to figures supplied by the Navajo Code Talkers Association, the number of Code Talkers has gone from more 400 to just 27.

Left: 
Navajo Code Talker Guy Clauschee waits for the 68th annual Navajo Nation Fair parade to begin on Saturday morning, Sept. 6, 2014, in Tse Bonito, N.M. Clauschee passed away early Thursday morning of natural causes, according to his family. Funeral services will be on Monday.

Right:
Purple Heart recipient Navajo Code Talker Robert Walley Sr, 93, Chichiltah, N.M. According to his paternal granddaughter Tanya Walley, he lost his battle to cancer.

Silver Nez Perry (on FB):
S—Dibé 
E—‘Ajaa’
M—Tsitł’élí
P—Bisóodi
E—Dzééh
R—Gah

F—Tsé’é’dǫ́’ii
I—Tin

M—Bii’ adeest’į́į́’
A—Woláchíí
R—Deenásts’aa’
I—Yihę́ę́s
N—Tsah
E—‘Anáá’

Ahxé’hée Shinálí, Shicheii, Shizhé’é … Yéego baa ‘áhééh nisin.
Ahxé’ee lą́ą nihich’ą́ą́ nísinbaa’

(Source: Navajo Times)

    Two Navajo Code Talkers died this past week, according to the tribal government and family members.
    Guy Clauschee, 87, died early Thursday morning, September 11, 2014, in Fort Defiance. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Monday at the Fort Defiance Presbyterian Church.

    A Code Talker throughout most of World War II, Clauschee came back from the war and continued his education at the Ganado Mission. After graduating in 1950, he moved to Window Rock and started work with the Bureau of indian Affairs as a facilities management foreman. He retired after 40 years.

    On Wednesday, September 10, 2014, tribal officials reported the death of another Navajo Code Talker, Robert Walley Sr., 93.

    Walley served as a Code Talker from 1943 to 1945, during which he received a Purple Heart. He served in the 6th Marine Division and was a Marine Raider who fought in the Battle of Bougainville, Guam, Okinawa and the occupation of Emirau Island.

    Both Walley and Clauschee received Congressional Silver Medals for their service as Navajo Code Talkers.

    According to figures supplied by the Navajo Code Talkers Association, the number of Code Talkers has gone from more 400 to just 27.

    Left:
    Navajo Code Talker Guy Clauschee waits for the 68th annual Navajo Nation Fair parade to begin on Saturday morning, Sept. 6, 2014, in Tse Bonito, N.M. Clauschee passed away early Thursday morning of natural causes, according to his family. Funeral services will be on Monday.

    Right:
    Purple Heart recipient Navajo Code Talker Robert Walley Sr, 93, Chichiltah, N.M. According to his paternal granddaughter Tanya Walley, he lost his battle to cancer.

    Silver Nez Perry (on FB):
    S—Dibé
    E—‘Ajaa’
    M—Tsitł’élí
    P—Bisóodi
    E—Dzééh
    R—Gah

    F—Tsé’é’dǫ́’ii
    I—Tin

    M—Bii’ adeest’į́į́’
    A—Woláchíí
    R—Deenásts’aa’
    I—Yihę́ę́s
    N—Tsah
    E—‘Anáá’

    Ahxé’hée Shinálí, Shicheii, Shizhé’é … Yéego baa ‘áhééh nisin.
    Ahxé’ee lą́ą nihich’ą́ą́ nísinbaa’

    (Source: Navajo Times)

  3. Photo post

    magicofnewyork:

FDNY Ten House “Still Standing”

    magicofnewyork:

    FDNY Ten House “Still Standing”

    (Source: Flickr / tr11787)

    Notes: 285 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  4. Photo post

    sept11memorials:

ROBERT MINARA
World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponders #Sept11 #NeverForgetFDNY: LADDER COMPANY 25
Robert Minara, of New York City, a firefighter with the New York Fire Department.

    sept11memorials:

    ROBERT MINARA
    World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponders #Sept11 #NeverForget

    FDNY: LADDER COMPANY 25

    Robert Minara, of New York City, a firefighter with the New York Fire Department.

    Notes: 20 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  5. Photo post

    “George Lucas’s designers must have found inspiration in these smoke helmets.”

This pair of early rescue masks, shown above, dates from between the mid-1800s and World War I. They look a bit familiar, right? Almost 100 years before Darth Vader and C-3PO hit the big screen in “Star Wars” in 1977, these two smoke helmets were worn by firefighters carrying out rescues in smoke-logged buildings. The buzz among collectors is that George Lucas’s designers must have found inspiration in these smoke helmets and others like them. In fact, one well-known 19th-century manufacturer was named Vajen-Bader—you could easily get the name Vader from that.

The black leather helmet on the left is labeled “Respirations Apparat” by “G.B.Konic Altona,” was made in Hamburg, Germany, and has the look of an African Dan mask. The brass, three-quarter face mask to its right was made in Paris by J. Mandet. This type of breathing mask had a very simple apparatus, allowing only a short range of operation. When used, air would be forced into the helmet through no more than 13 meters of flexible tubing by means of a bellows operated remotely from the outside. Both of these masks have mica lenses to help protect the eyes from heat.

    “George Lucas’s designers must have found inspiration in these smoke helmets.”

    This pair of early rescue masks, shown above, dates from between the mid-1800s and World War I. They look a bit familiar, right? Almost 100 years before Darth Vader and C-3PO hit the big screen in “Star Wars” in 1977, these two smoke helmets were worn by firefighters carrying out rescues in smoke-logged buildings. The buzz among collectors is that George Lucas’s designers must have found inspiration in these smoke helmets and others like them. In fact, one well-known 19th-century manufacturer was named Vajen-Bader—you could easily get the name Vader from that.

    The black leather helmet on the left is labeled “Respirations Apparat” by “G.B.Konic Altona,” was made in Hamburg, Germany, and has the look of an African Dan mask. The brass, three-quarter face mask to its right was made in Paris by J. Mandet. This type of breathing mask had a very simple apparatus, allowing only a short range of operation. When used, air would be forced into the helmet through no more than 13 meters of flexible tubing by means of a bellows operated remotely from the outside. Both of these masks have mica lenses to help protect the eyes from heat.

  6. Photo post

    sept11memorials:

#NYPD #FirstResponders #Sept11
Twenty-three New York City Police Officers died in the line of duty on September 11, 2001 as they responded to the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. The commands that lost members that day included the Emergency Service Unit, Squads 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 10; the 6, 13 and 40 Precincts; the Bomb Squad; Transit Bureau District 4; Traffic Control Division; and the Police Academy Video Production Unit.

Sergeant John G. Coughlin
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.4
Sergeant Michael S. Curtin
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.2
Sergeant Rodney C.Gillis
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.8
Sergeant Timothy A. Roy
September 11, 2001
Traffic Control Division Bus Unit
Detective Claude D Richards
September 11, 2001
Bomb Squad
Detective Joseph V. Vigiano
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.2
Police Officer John D’Allara
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.2
Police Officer Vincent G. Danz
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.3
Police Officer Jerome M. Dominguez
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.3
Police Officer Stephen P. Driscoll
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.4
Police Officer Mark J. Ellis
September 11, 2001
Transit Bureau, District 4
Police Officer Robert Fazio
September 11, 2001
13th Precinct
Police Officer Ronald P. Kloepfer
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.7
Police Officer Thomas M. Langone
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.10
Police Officer James P. Leahy
September 11, 2001
6th Precinct
Police Officer Brian G. McDonnell
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.1
Police Officer John W. Perry
September 11, 2001
40th Precinct
Police Officer Glen K. Pettit
September 11, 2001
Police Academy Video Production Unit
Police Officer Moira A. Smith
September 11, 2001
13th Precinct
Police Officer Ramon Suarez
September 11, 2001
Transit Bureau, District 4
Police Officer Paul Talty
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.10
Police Officer Santos Valentin Jr.
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.7
Police Officer Walter E. Weaver
September 11, 2001
Emergency Service Squad No.3
The following members of the service have perished since as a result of illnesses contracted from exposure at Ground Zero and Fresh Kills.

In the rescue and recovery efforts that followed the destruction of the World Trade Center a decade ago, thousands of New York City Police Department Personnel worked long hours and days on end, initially in the hope of finding survivors and afterwards to recover their fallen comrades and others who died on 9/11. Exposed to toxic smoke and other hazards, more than 50 members of the service who engaged in rescue and recovery efforts developed cancers and other fatal illnesses. Sadly, that chapter of the post 9/11 saga has not yet closed as we expect to add in the months and years ahead to the list of 50 whose names are listed below:

Police Officer Edward Ferraro
6/6/2004
Management Information Systems Division
Police Officer James Godbee
12/30/2004
28 Precinct
Police Officer Thomas Brophy
4/21/2005
109 Precinct
Police Officer Ronald Weintraub
11/16/2005
Midtown South Precinct
Detective James Zadroga
1/5/2006
Manhattan South Homicide
Detective Sandra Adrian
1/11/2006
Internal Affairs Bureau
Police Officer Angelo Peluso
5/24/2006
Licensing Division
Captain Edward Gilpin
9/7/2006
Patrol Borough Manhattan South
Police Officer Patrice Ott
9/8/2006
Property Clerk Division
Police Officer Daniel Conroy
12/3/2006
Property Clerk Division
Detective Roberto Rivera
1/27/2007
Joint Terrorist Task Force
Detective John Young
2/19/2007
50 Detective Squad
Police Officer Louise Johnston
3/6/2007
Patrol Borough Brooklyn South Task Force
Detective Kevin Hawkins
5/7/2007
Intelligence Division
Detective Robert Williamson
5/13/2007
Patrol Borough Manhattan South Anti-Crime
Police Officer Madeline Carlo
7/15/2007
Housing Bureau
Police Officer Robert Helmke
7/28/2007
Medical Division
Sergeant Claire Hanrahan
8/28/2007
Narcotics Borough Manhattan North
Sergeant Michael Ryan
11/5/2007
Warrant Section
Detective William Holfester
1/22/2008
Narcotics Borough Manhattan North
Sergeant Edward Thompson
3/9/2008
Intelligence Division
Detective John Goggin
5/6/2008
94 Detective Squad
Auto Mechanic Elmis Fisher
6/1/2008
Fleet Services Division
Police Officer Christopher McMurry
8/1/2008
77 Precinct
Police Officer Gary Mausberg
10/8/2008
73 Precinct
Police Officer Robert Nicosia
10/10/2008
Technical Assistance and Response Unit
Inspector Richard Winter
10/25/2008
Fleet Services Division
Sergeant Alex Baez
11/22/2008
84 Precinct
Police Officer Vito Mauro
12/2/2008
67 Precinct
Lieutenant Brian Mohamed
3/25/2009
20 Precinct
Lieutenant Gerald Rex
3/30/2009
Patrol Borough Manhattan South
Police Officer Robert Zane
5/12/2009
Transit District 34
Police Officer Richard Jakubowsky
6/7/2009
Transit Borough Bronx Task Force
Detective Michael Morales
6/10/2009
122 Detective Squad
Police Officer Renee Dunbar
8/25/2009
103 Precinct
Inspector Donald Feser
9/12/2009
Manhattan Traffic Task Force
Detective First Grade Corey Diaz
10/7/2009
Investigative Support Division
Police Officer Robert Grossman
10/9/2009
28 Precinct
Sergeant Charles Clark
11/7/2009
Police Service Area 8
Lieutenant Special Assignment Carlos Ocasio
11/21/2009
Office, Deputy Commissioner Training
Police Officer Frank Bolusi
1/12/2010
120 Precinct
Police Officer Robert Oswain
5/15/2010
47 Precinct
Detective Joseph Seabrook
5/29/2010
20 Precinct
Lieutenant Special Assignment Jacqueline McCarthy
7/5/2010
Employee Relations Section
Police Officer David Mahmoud
11/11/2010
75 Precinct
Police Officer Robert Ehmer
11/21/2010
110 Precinct
Detective First Grade Kevin Czartoryski
12/5/2010
Office, Deputy Commissioner Public Information
Sergeant Harold Smith
3/5/2011
Narcotics Borough Staten Island
Police Officer George Wong
3/24/2011
Headquarters Security Unit
Police Officer Martin Tom
6/9/2011
Licensing Division
Captain Barry Galfano
6/26/2011
Emergency Service Unit
Detective Edwin Ortiz
7/4/2011
40 Precinct Detective Squad
Detective Alick W. Herrmann
12/23/2011
100 Precinct Detective Squad
Police Officer Denis R. Mclarney
3/1/2012
Brooklyn Court Section
Lieutenant Christopher M. Pupo
6/23/2012
41 Precinct
Sergeant Garrett S. Danza
7/11/2012
Communications Division
Captain Dennis Morales
7/27/2012
Emergency Service Unit

Source: nyc.gov

    sept11memorials:

    #NYPD #FirstResponders #Sept11
    Twenty-three New York City Police Officers died in the line of duty on September 11, 2001 as they responded to the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. The commands that lost members that day included the Emergency Service Unit, Squads 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 10; the 6, 13 and 40 Precincts; the Bomb Squad; Transit Bureau District 4; Traffic Control Division; and the Police Academy Video Production Unit.

    Sergeant John G. Coughlin
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.4
    Sergeant Michael S. Curtin
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.2
    Sergeant Rodney C.Gillis
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.8
    Sergeant Timothy A. Roy
    September 11, 2001
    Traffic Control Division Bus Unit
    Detective Claude D Richards
    September 11, 2001
    Bomb Squad
    Detective Joseph V. Vigiano
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.2
    Police Officer John D’Allara
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.2
    Police Officer Vincent G. Danz
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.3
    Police Officer Jerome M. Dominguez
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.3
    Police Officer Stephen P. Driscoll
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.4
    Police Officer Mark J. Ellis
    September 11, 2001
    Transit Bureau, District 4
    Police Officer Robert Fazio
    September 11, 2001
    13th Precinct
    Police Officer Ronald P. Kloepfer
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.7
    Police Officer Thomas M. Langone
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.10
    Police Officer James P. Leahy
    September 11, 2001
    6th Precinct
    Police Officer Brian G. McDonnell
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.1
    Police Officer John W. Perry
    September 11, 2001
    40th Precinct
    Police Officer Glen K. Pettit
    September 11, 2001
    Police Academy Video Production Unit
    Police Officer Moira A. Smith
    September 11, 2001
    13th Precinct
    Police Officer Ramon Suarez
    September 11, 2001
    Transit Bureau, District 4
    Police Officer Paul Talty
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.10
    Police Officer Santos Valentin Jr.
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.7
    Police Officer Walter E. Weaver
    September 11, 2001
    Emergency Service Squad No.3
    The following members of the service have perished since as a result of illnesses contracted from exposure at Ground Zero and Fresh Kills.

    In the rescue and recovery efforts that followed the destruction of the World Trade Center a decade ago, thousands of New York City Police Department Personnel worked long hours and days on end, initially in the hope of finding survivors and afterwards to recover their fallen comrades and others who died on 9/11. Exposed to toxic smoke and other hazards, more than 50 members of the service who engaged in rescue and recovery efforts developed cancers and other fatal illnesses. Sadly, that chapter of the post 9/11 saga has not yet closed as we expect to add in the months and years ahead to the list of 50 whose names are listed below:

    Police Officer Edward Ferraro
    6/6/2004
    Management Information Systems Division
    Police Officer James Godbee
    12/30/2004
    28 Precinct
    Police Officer Thomas Brophy
    4/21/2005
    109 Precinct
    Police Officer Ronald Weintraub
    11/16/2005
    Midtown South Precinct
    Detective James Zadroga
    1/5/2006
    Manhattan South Homicide
    Detective Sandra Adrian
    1/11/2006
    Internal Affairs Bureau
    Police Officer Angelo Peluso
    5/24/2006
    Licensing Division
    Captain Edward Gilpin
    9/7/2006
    Patrol Borough Manhattan South
    Police Officer Patrice Ott
    9/8/2006
    Property Clerk Division
    Police Officer Daniel Conroy
    12/3/2006
    Property Clerk Division
    Detective Roberto Rivera
    1/27/2007
    Joint Terrorist Task Force
    Detective John Young
    2/19/2007
    50 Detective Squad
    Police Officer Louise Johnston
    3/6/2007
    Patrol Borough Brooklyn South Task Force
    Detective Kevin Hawkins
    5/7/2007
    Intelligence Division
    Detective Robert Williamson
    5/13/2007
    Patrol Borough Manhattan South Anti-Crime
    Police Officer Madeline Carlo
    7/15/2007
    Housing Bureau
    Police Officer Robert Helmke
    7/28/2007
    Medical Division
    Sergeant Claire Hanrahan
    8/28/2007
    Narcotics Borough Manhattan North
    Sergeant Michael Ryan
    11/5/2007
    Warrant Section
    Detective William Holfester
    1/22/2008
    Narcotics Borough Manhattan North
    Sergeant Edward Thompson
    3/9/2008
    Intelligence Division
    Detective John Goggin
    5/6/2008
    94 Detective Squad
    Auto Mechanic Elmis Fisher
    6/1/2008
    Fleet Services Division
    Police Officer Christopher McMurry
    8/1/2008
    77 Precinct
    Police Officer Gary Mausberg
    10/8/2008
    73 Precinct
    Police Officer Robert Nicosia
    10/10/2008
    Technical Assistance and Response Unit
    Inspector Richard Winter
    10/25/2008
    Fleet Services Division
    Sergeant Alex Baez
    11/22/2008
    84 Precinct
    Police Officer Vito Mauro
    12/2/2008
    67 Precinct
    Lieutenant Brian Mohamed
    3/25/2009
    20 Precinct
    Lieutenant Gerald Rex
    3/30/2009
    Patrol Borough Manhattan South
    Police Officer Robert Zane
    5/12/2009
    Transit District 34
    Police Officer Richard Jakubowsky
    6/7/2009
    Transit Borough Bronx Task Force
    Detective Michael Morales
    6/10/2009
    122 Detective Squad
    Police Officer Renee Dunbar
    8/25/2009
    103 Precinct
    Inspector Donald Feser
    9/12/2009
    Manhattan Traffic Task Force
    Detective First Grade Corey Diaz
    10/7/2009
    Investigative Support Division
    Police Officer Robert Grossman
    10/9/2009
    28 Precinct
    Sergeant Charles Clark
    11/7/2009
    Police Service Area 8
    Lieutenant Special Assignment Carlos Ocasio
    11/21/2009
    Office, Deputy Commissioner Training
    Police Officer Frank Bolusi
    1/12/2010
    120 Precinct
    Police Officer Robert Oswain
    5/15/2010
    47 Precinct
    Detective Joseph Seabrook
    5/29/2010
    20 Precinct
    Lieutenant Special Assignment Jacqueline McCarthy
    7/5/2010
    Employee Relations Section
    Police Officer David Mahmoud
    11/11/2010
    75 Precinct
    Police Officer Robert Ehmer
    11/21/2010
    110 Precinct
    Detective First Grade Kevin Czartoryski
    12/5/2010
    Office, Deputy Commissioner Public Information
    Sergeant Harold Smith
    3/5/2011
    Narcotics Borough Staten Island
    Police Officer George Wong
    3/24/2011
    Headquarters Security Unit
    Police Officer Martin Tom
    6/9/2011
    Licensing Division
    Captain Barry Galfano
    6/26/2011
    Emergency Service Unit
    Detective Edwin Ortiz
    7/4/2011
    40 Precinct Detective Squad
    Detective Alick W. Herrmann
    12/23/2011
    100 Precinct Detective Squad
    Police Officer Denis R. Mclarney
    3/1/2012
    Brooklyn Court Section
    Lieutenant Christopher M. Pupo
    6/23/2012
    41 Precinct
    Sergeant Garrett S. Danza
    7/11/2012
    Communications Division
    Captain Dennis Morales
    7/27/2012
    Emergency Service Unit

    Source: nyc.gov

    Notes: 112 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  7. Video post

    sept11memorials:

    "Bretagne" Last known 9/11 Ground Zero search dog still lends a helping paw. #RescueDogs #NeverForget #Honor911

    By Laura T. Coffey: TODAY
    9/10/14

    Some heroes boast muscle and brawn. Others possess steely nerves and impeccable timing. But this hero is a little different.

    This one has feathery fur, a sunny smile, a calm nature and — for a dog — an uncanny ability to zero in on the people who need her most. She’s a 15-year-old golden retriever named ‘Bretagne’, and she’s believed to be the last surviving search dog who worked at Ground Zero in New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (One other surviving search dog from 9/11, a 15-year-old English springer spaniel named Morgan, worked at Staten Island.)

    For the first time since the recovery efforts after the attack, Bretagne returned this week to the site of the former World Trade Center complex with her longtime handler and owner, Denise Corliss of Cypress, Texas. They were joined by NBC News’ Tom Brokaw, who will tell their story on TODAY on Thursday morning, Sept. 11.

    Notes: 2,461 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  8. Photo post

    sept11memorials:

SHAKILA MIAH
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Sept11
HUSBAND AND WIFE KILLED

Long ago in Bangladesh, Nural Miah’s grand father hunted birds in the jungle. The tradition lapsed when the family came to New York, until Mr. Miah, an audiovisual technologist at the World Trade Center, took it up with a fire-hot passion. He taught hunting to Mohammed Sadat, his 15- year-old cousin, and took him on weeklong hunting vacations.

"We expressed our feelings," Mohammed said. "We both talked about whatever we had on our minds. Three years ago, he talked about this girl, Shakila. The parents didn’t want her to get married to him. So he would leave a deer caller on the machine and when she heard the deer’s voice, she’d know."

But Mohammed worried last year when Mr. Miah said he and Shakila were to be married. She was a computer technician who also worked at the trade center. “I confronted my cousin,” he said. “I said, ‘You’re going to be married and leave me?’ “

Instead, Mrs. Miah drew Mohammed in, inviting him into their new Brooklyn home, furnished with antiques and eight-point antlers. The hunting in the woods, just Mr. Miah and Mohammed, continued. “It was peaceful,” he said. “All about nature. All about relaxing. He watched out for me. He was like a brother.” 

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on October 6, 2001.

    sept11memorials:

    SHAKILA MIAH
    World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Sept11
    HUSBAND AND WIFE KILLED

    Long ago in Bangladesh, Nural Miah’s grand father hunted birds in the jungle. The tradition lapsed when the family came to New York, until Mr. Miah, an audiovisual technologist at the World Trade Center, took it up with a fire-hot passion. He taught hunting to Mohammed Sadat, his 15- year-old cousin, and took him on weeklong hunting vacations.

    "We expressed our feelings," Mohammed said. "We both talked about whatever we had on our minds. Three years ago, he talked about this girl, Shakila. The parents didn’t want her to get married to him. So he would leave a deer caller on the machine and when she heard the deer’s voice, she’d know."

    But Mohammed worried last year when Mr. Miah said he and Shakila were to be married. She was a computer technician who also worked at the trade center. “I confronted my cousin,” he said. “I said, ‘You’re going to be married and leave me?’ “

    Instead, Mrs. Miah drew Mohammed in, inviting him into their new Brooklyn home, furnished with antiques and eight-point antlers. The hunting in the woods, just Mr. Miah and Mohammed, continued. “It was peaceful,” he said. “All about nature. All about relaxing. He watched out for me. He was like a brother.”

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on October 6, 2001.

    Notes: 12 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  9. Video post

    sept11memorials:

    CHARLES MENDEZ, 38
    World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponder #FDNY
    FDNY: LADDER 7

    Charles R. Mendez was a reed of a boy who grew up to be a “good sized” man with a heart to match, said his mother, Doris Mendez. When Mr. Mendez’s father died, he was a tremendous help to his mother, even though he was only 21.

    Mr. Mendez was a firefighter with Ladder Company 7 in Manhattan. His last job was at the World Trade Center. He was 38.

    "He was sort of quiet but well-liked all over," Mrs. Mendez said. "He wanted to be a policeman, first. Then he was working for a bank but when the Fire Department called him, that was his glory. He loved that job."

    Firefighter Mendez’s wife, Kelli, said her husband so enjoyed his job that there were many mornings he rose early to leave home in Floral Park, on Long Island, to get to work. When he was not working, he renovated their old house, she said. He learned how to be handy by reading books.

    "He was always doing something," she said. "We had a million friends and we were always out doing something. We probably vacationed five times a year. I have no regrets — we never canceled, we never said we can’t go, we just did it.

    "He was just a wonderful, wonderful person. If I’d known five years ago this would happen, I still would have married him. He was it. He was my best friend."

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 20, 2001.

    Notes: 13 notes

    Reblogged from: sept11memorials

  10. Video post

    sept11memorials:

    STUART TODD MELTZER, 32
    World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Sept11 
    CANTOR FITZGERALD

    When the phone rang in the middle of a baseball game, Larry Meltzer almost always knew who it was. “Did you see that? I can’t believe that pitch,” said the familiar voice of his younger brother, Stuart Todd Meltzer.

    Then came the click.

    "There was no hello, no goodbye, no nothing," Larry Meltzer said of his frequent conversations about sports with his brother, a 32-year-old energy broker at Cantor Fitzgerald. "We didn’t need those things. We would talk like five times a day, easy."

    Larry and Stuart Meltzer always talked sports. It was what they lived for — the season tickets they had for the New England Patriots and Boston Red Sox never went unused as long as they had time for the 5 a.m. drive to Boston, the tailgate parties, the game, then the long drive back to the city.

    Until Stuart Meltzer’s eldest son, Jacob, was born four years ago, that is. The boy replaced baseball as Stuart’s first love. Larry had to start finding someone else to go to games with him.

    "I’d say, `Come on, man, let’s go to a game,’ " Larry said. "But he’d say, `Nah, I’ve got to spend time with Jake. When you have kids you’ll understand.’ I think I understand now."

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on September 1, 2002.

    Stuart Todd Meltzer, at 32; worked at Cantor Fitzgerald

    By Globe Staff, 9/22/2001

    Stuart Todd Meltzer of Long Island, N.Y., formerly of Newton, died in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 11. He was 32.

    Mr. Meltzer, an employee of bond-trading firm Cantor Fitzgerald who moved to New York five years ago, graduated in 1986 from The Rivers School in Weston, where he excelled in football, basketball, and baseball. At graduation he received the Andrew N. Navoni award for leadership, superior sportsmanship, dedication, and competitive excellence in baseball.

    Mr. Meltzer spent two years at the University of Michigan, where he played baseball, and later graduated from Trinity College in Hartford.

    Mr. Meltzer spent two years in California with the theatrical agency Creative Artists. He moved to New York and worked for Miramax, then switched careers to the energy business. Three months ago, Mr. Meltzer began working for the Cantor Fitzgerald Trade Spark Division, and on the Friday before the terrorist attack he was promoted to head of West Coast Power Management.

    "He attained goals that other 32-year-olds just dream of. He was a fabulous person – father, husband, brother, son. I never realized the extent to which he touched people’s lives," said his father, Zachary.

    When Mr. Meltzer realized he might not make it out of the World Trade Center, he used his cell phone to call his wife, Lisa. He told her: “Honey, something terrible is happening. It’s very bad up here. I don’t think I’m going to make it. I love you. Take care of the children,” his father recounted.

    Besides his wife, Mr. Meltzer leaves two sons, Jake and Dylan; his parents, Zachary and Joyce of Centerville; and two brothers, Lawrence of New Jersey and Kenneth of Natick.

    A memorial service will be held at Temple Emeth in Brookline on Tuesday at 1 p.m.

    Editorial Obituary published in THE BOSTON GLOBE on September 22, 2001.

    Notes: 13 notes

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    RAYMOND MEISENHEIMER
    World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponders #Heroes #Sept11
    FDNY: READY TO RETIRE AFTER 20 YRS

    Raymond Meisenheimer had the new patio penciled in, down to individual flowers and the Jacuzzi. He was supposed to retire in November, his 20th anniversary with the New York City Fire Department, and he and his wife, Joanne, and their daughters, Lauren, 15, and Kaitlynn, 13, were supposed to move from West Babylon, N.Y., to Holtsville.

    "We found the house of our dreams and were getting it built," Mrs. Meisenheimer said. "He got to see up to the spackling. We spent our mornings out here; we’d have breakfast at the house. We had a lot of plans. Unfortunately it didn’t work out. But he’s here, I know that. I know that."

    Mr. Meisenheimer planned to finish the basement. “It was going to be the He-Man Woman-Haters Club, because he had all girls,” his wife said.

    "He always called me Queenie, that was his nickname, and of course he was the king," Mrs. Meisenheimer said. The girls played along. "He’d say, `Who’s the king?’ and they’d say, `Oh you are, Daddy!’ That’s just the way he was."

    All four were involved in choosing cabinets and tiles for the new house.

    "Right now my girls want to follow through with everything he wanted," she said. "We are going to finish the basement and patio, finish it the way he wanted."

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on August 25, 2002.

    Notes: 10 notes

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    DAMIAN MEEHAN, 32
    World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Sept11
    FAMILY OF FIRST RESPONDERS

    This summer, Damian Meehan celebrated a milestone best appreciated by other rookie golfers struggling for some semblance of par: he finally broke 100. And his foursome included three of his six brothers, so the feat did not pass unverified. Several brotherly beers were shared that day, recalled his brother Michael. The Meehan boys had played Gaelic football since childhood, but recently five of them took up golf and made a habit of getting away for a weekly game, followed by a nice dinner and animated reminiscences.

    Mr. Meehan, 32, was the baby of the brothers. As they grew up in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan, they bossed him unmercifully, but he took it in stride. Last year the brothers pitched in and completely renovated the house he shared in Glen Rock, N.J., with his wife, Joanne, and their 18-month-old son. Another baby is on the way.

    In a family of police officers and firefighters, he was the quiet and serious brother, the only one of his nine siblings to wind up on Wall Street. He was an up-and-coming trader at Carr Futures, and he loved his job all the more, said his brother Michael, because so many of his bosses and co-workers were from the old neighborhood. “Everything with us,” he said, “is family.”

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on September 25, 2001.

    Notes: 16 notes

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    DENNIS P. MCHUGH, 34
    World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponders #NeverForget
    FDNY LADDER 13

    There wasn’t much that Dennis P. McHugh, 34, couldn’t do. He ran the New York City Marathon, played Gaelic football, married the beautiful Una Hinchcliffe and became the proud father of Chloe, 5, and Sophie and Joseph, who both turned 1 last week. When he became a firefighter with Ladder Company 13 three years ago, “he was about as perfect as you can get,” said his friend Chris Gainer, who graduated from the Fire Academy with him and, in longstanding firehouse tradition, became “the bad probie” while Mr. McHugh was “the good probie.”

    On summer mornings at the family place in Montauk, Mr. McHugh’s brothers-in-law would wake up and rush to the window, “to see if he’d done all the chores,” said Rob Hinchcliffe. “By the time we’d woken up at 11 o’clock, this guy had already painted the house and mowed the lawn. It was an ongoing joke. Dennis always made us look bad as sons.”

    For the twins’ birthday, Mrs. McHugh asked everyone in the family to write down their memories of her husband. She has created a Web site, www.nyfdwidows.net, listing information about books and other ways to cope with loss, as another tribute to him. “He was always so optimistic,” she said. “He always saw the glass as half full.”

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 14, 2001.

    Dennis P. McHugh Foundation:
    http://www.dennispmchugh.org

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    BRIAN G. MCDONNELL
    World Trade Center: @USArmy #Veteran #Paratrooper #NYPD #FirstResponders #NeverForget
    ‘A COP’S COP’

    Maggie McDonnell is trying to keep Christmas normal for her two children. Their Long Island lawn is decorated in lights and they will have a tree. The tree will be decorated in red, white and blue, and Daddy’s police cap will stand atop it.

    Brian McDonnell was a member of the Emergency Service Unit Truck 1, stationed on East 21st Street in Manhattan. He was last seen heading into the south tower. “Brian was a cop’s cop,” Mrs. McDonnell said. “When people get in trouble they call the police; when the police get in trouble they call Emergency Services.”

    But more important to him than the job were his children, Katie, 8, and Thomas, 3. When his daughter was born, he was there in the delivery room holding his wife’s hand, gently weeping.

    A former Army paratrooper, Officer McDonnell, 38, was never decorated in his 15-year career because he never wrote himself up for an commendation. “He wasn’t showy,” his wife said. “It wasn’t his nature. He just wanted to help people.”

    Once, he saw a little girl waving to him and the mother pulled her in the window and scolded her: ” ‘Don’t wave to him, police are bad,’ ” Mrs. McDonnell recalled. “It crushed him.”
    - The New York Times 12/15/2001

    McDONNELL-Brian, N.Y.P.D. Police Officer. Tragically lost in the line of duty on September 11, 2001 in the World Trade Center disaster. Survived by his beloved wife Margaret and cherished children Katie and Thomas, dear brothers Robert and Kevin, devoted sister Alicia, and his loving mother Ann Claire. Brian was a loyal friend to many, and he will be sorely missed. His command was Emergency Service Squad.
    - The New York Times 10/11/2001

    Police officer Brian McDonnell wanted to change the world, and he’d do anything to save a life. A member of New York City’s emergency service unit, his squad was among the first to respond to the World Trade Center disaster Tuesday.

    "He thought about others before himself," said Glenn Gering, a close friend who grew up with McDonnell, 38, in Wantagh. "He wanted to change the world," Gering said.

    The Emergency Service Unit is made up of about 350 men and women who risk their lives to save others. Fourteen members of the unit are unaccounted for.

    McDonnell, who has been a police officer for more than 10 years and was a member of the armed forces before that, is a devoted husband and father of two, Gering said.

    McDonnell was supposed to go to Gering’s house tomorrow for cake and coffee. “Unfortunately, because of our schedules, we didn’t get together as often as we would have liked,” Gering said.

    "I hope all of America will never forget this horrific act of terror," Gering said in a letter to Newsday, vand more importantly, never forget my friend, Brian McDonnell, an American hero."

    - New York Newsday Victim Database 9/15/2001

    Police Officer Brian G. McDonnell, 38, was first appointed to the NYPD on January 20, 1987, and began his career on patrol in Neighborhood Stablization Unit 3. He took a brief leave of absence to join the police department in Tucson, Arizona, but was reappointed to the NYPD on October 16, 1990. Prior to being assigned to ESU, he worked in the 106 and 110 Precincts, as well as the Narcotics Division and Patrol Borough Queens South Task Force. A veteran of the United States Army, he served in the 82nd Airborne Division, and was also a graduate of the State University of New York at Farmingdale. His hobbies included power lifting, swimming, diving, cooking, bicycling, soccer, auto repair, and the martial arts. He is survived by his wife Margaret; children Katie and Thomas; mother Ann; sister Alicia; and brothers Kevin and Robert.
    - SPRING 3100, Commemorative Issue

    (Photos from Brian McDonnell’s brother-in-law Jorge)

    Source: nypdangels.com

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    JOHN MCAVOY, 47
    World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Firefighter #FirstResponders #Honor911
    FDNY: LADDER 3

    John McAvoy, a firefighter assigned to Ladder Company 3 in Manhattan, did not hesitate to speak his mind — even when it made him sound opinionated. But his wife and two brothers have even more to say than he did.

    Paula McAvoy remembers her handsome husband as a figure of power and grace on the rink. Mr. McAvoy, 47, coached hockey teams on Staten Island, where he lived with her, their children Kate and Kevin, and the family dog, Zoo. Mrs. McAvoy had to drag him onto the dance floor. “And yet he skated beautifully,” she said.

    Michael McAvoy, the youngest McAvoy brother, said Mr. McAvoy “never gave up on me when there were times I gave up on myself.” George McAvoy, the oldest one, recalled that the “incredibly protective” John, out on a jog, once pulled two elderly people out of a burning house, went back for their cat, then continued on his run.

    Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 26, 2001.

    Remembering John McAvoy

    Ode to my brother John
    by Michael McAvoy

    To know my brother John is to have an opinion of him. He was steadfast in his convictions and never wavered from them.

    My opinion of John, and I am sure everyone here would agree, he gave a lot more of himself then he received. I don’t think it is a stretch to say that John put all of us ahead of himself. His helping hands and warm heart touched many of us gathered here and countless people even he did not know.

    John was my older brother, a label he wore with much honor. John took the older brother responsibility very seriously. I always felt confident and secure knowing John was there. If I had a problem, it was his problem too. He never gave up on me when there were times I gave up on myself. Part of me wanted to grow out from under his wings, most of me wanted and needed his care, guidance and protection, not to mention his delicious linguine and clam sauce.

    John was more than a hero firefighter, a doting husband, a caring father, a loving son, a tireless hockey coach and a protective older brother. He was the cook at the annual family picnic. He was also everyone’s “Mr. Fix It.”

    His love for his fellow man and the passion with which he lived his life, I truly admire. John McAvoy was bigger than life itself. Shoes many of us could never fill. He was the dream son every parent would cherish. Parents who have a few children, say they don’t have a favorite. I can easily say that he was the overwhelming favorite, he is my favorite too!!

    John, if it hadn’t been for growing up with you, I wouldn’t be the person I am today. I want you to know how much I admire your courage, respect you as a man and love you as a brother. Thanks for all the love, laughter and protection you have given all of us. John thanks for being you.

    The pain is universal

    Be assured that the pain felt for the lost brothers of Ladder 3 is universal and is sorely felt far away. For me and my family it is somewhat sentimentally a shared pain. You see I too am a McAvoy and so I too feel that I have lost one of our own.

    Years ago my Grandfather (from County Laois) told me that I was related to all the McAvoy’s all over the world. A visit a few years back to McAvoy’s pub outside of Dublin convinced me that he was right as we were truly treated like long lost cousins. (With proper amounts of Jamesons’ I might add). So when I learned of the loss of Firefighter John McAvoy I truly felt a twinge of personal pain. As I read more about him and his life I came to feel that I knew him and believe it or not saw traits that I’d seen in other McAvoy’s.

    Then as I continued to read about all of the wonderful men of Ladder 3 who we lost that day the pain became almost overwhelming for me. What magnificent men they were. What true heroes all. Truly our earth has been blessed to have them with us for much to short a time. For our family the connection with the losses in FDNY grew when we learned of the passing of Firefighter Steven Coakley. You see we are Coakleys too. In fact my great grandfather Coakley and his brother were lifelong firefighters in New jersey.

    We have been so touched by all of this that this year my wife and I are coming to spend Christmas in New York. We want to come to Ladder 3 to say from the bottom of our hearts, thank you and our hearts and our prayers are with you and we share your grief and that of your families. We hope that you will permit us to visit you and to deliver our feelings in person. We particularly extend our deepest sympathy to the family of John McAvoy.

    As I look out over the Chesapeake bay, where we live, the heavens seem to be a little brighter. And I’m sure they are because I’m certain that there are at least 12 new stars brightly shining there, one for each of the men from Ladder 3.

    Thank you for all that you do. take care and God Bless!!

    Most sincerely,

    Elizabeth and Jim McAvoy

    Notes: 24 notes

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