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  1. Photo post

    U.S. Marines in Vietnam by Larry Burrows 1966
life.time.com

    U.S. Marines in Vietnam by Larry Burrows 1966
    life.time.com

  2. Photo post

    peerintothepast:

Wally’s barber shop on St Martin Street has defiant signs outside after losing its windows during the London blitz. 21st Nov 1940

    peerintothepast:

    Wally’s barber shop on St Martin Street has defiant signs outside after losing its windows during the London blitz. 21st Nov 1940

    Notes: 973 notes

    Reblogged from: peerintothepast

  3. Video post

    #USMC Sgt. Major Thomas B. Crump, who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor while serving with the Marines, died Tuesday, July 8, 2014. He was 93 years old.

    The ninth of 10 children, Crump grew up in a poor family in Lee County, Miss.
    When he was 7, his father died and the family lost their cotton farm. Some of the children were sent to live with neighbors; Crump and two of his siblings lived in a widows home where their mother worked.

    In 1940, he saw a man in a striking uniform and asked him where he got it.
    Thats how Crump came to be a Marine. After training in San Diego, he was sent to Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, where he was assigned to work for naval intelligence, guarding the dry docks. On Dec. 7, he started work at 4 a.m. The first bomb fell at 7:55.

    He was on guard duty alongside the USS Pennsylvania, standing on a dock when he was knocked to the ground.

    Almost immediately he began to return fire. He later proudly told friends, he was one of the first. “It was the most traumatic thing I have ever witnessed in my life. I was absolutely scared to death,” Crump said. “When you see bodies blown apart and bodies on fire during a situation like that, it stays in your gut for the rest of your life.”

    Crump also fought in the battles of Bougainville, Pelileu and Okinawa. In 1953, Crump returned to combat in Korea. In 1964, Crump was sent to Louisville to serve as a recruiter for the Marine Corps.

    Sgt. Maj. Crump retired from the Marines in 1970 but continued to be involved with the JROTC program he started at Seneca High School, the longest running program of its kind. He was a veteran of three wars. He served in the Marines for 30 years.

    Sgt. Major Crump died at Oaklawn Nursing and Rehab Center surrounded by a group of Marines. Those men helped organize his visitation and funeral, ensuring Crump would receive full military honors.

    On Friday, July 11, 2014, dozens of retired Marines, wearing red jackets and white dress gloves, filed in one by one to salute Crump.

    He was laid out wearing his full dress uniform. A baseball ball cap reading “Pearl Harbor Survivor” was placed above his shoulder. As those Marines stood at attention, Crump was awarded a recognition medal that was placed above his heart.

    "Just to be able to say he’s my friend, my personal friend is an honor. Truly he’s an American hero," said CJ Wychulis, who is also a retired marine.

    "He talked about when the Japanese were flying in dropping bombs. Of course it was nothing but panic. All the stuff in the water, he was trying to help people," Wychulis remembered Crump telling him.

    "He never considered himself a hero, all the other veterans were heroes," he added. He spoke of his Marine Corps service with passion, eloquence and humility.

    Crump was laid to rest Saturday, July 12, 2014 at Calvary Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky.

  4. Photo post

    A stretcher-case being carried back along a duck board track through a wilderness of mud and shell-holes near Ypres. 15th February 1918. (IWM. Colourised by Doug Banks)

    A stretcher-case being carried back along a duck board track through a wilderness of mud and shell-holes near Ypres. 15th February 1918. (IWM. Colourised by Doug Banks)

  5. Video post

    "I’m actually writing history. It isn’t what you’d call big history. I don’t write about presidents and generals… I write about the man who was ranching, the man who was mining, the man who was opening up the country." ~Louis L’Amour

  6. Photo post

    Carlos “White Feather” Hathcock..  some say the best Marine sniper ever. Semper Fi

    Carlos “White Feather” Hathcock.. some say the best Marine sniper ever. Semper Fi

    Notes: 89 notes

    Reblogged from: uknoweholmes

  7. Photo post

    deathabilly3117:

M-25 White Feather built/named for legendary Marine Corps Sniper GySgt Carlos Hathcock II

    deathabilly3117:

    M-25 White Feather built/named for legendary Marine Corps Sniper GySgt Carlos Hathcock II

    Notes: 289 notes

    Reblogged from: deathabilly3117

  8. Video post

    One Homeless Veteran is one too many. #SupportOurVeterans

  9. Photo post

    Brooklyn Bridge, New York City, ca. 1904 
(via History In Color on FB)

    Brooklyn Bridge, New York City, ca. 1904 
    (via History In Color on FB)

  10. Photo post

    Boy Scouts with flags charging up Fifth Avenue in New York City during a “Wake Up, America!” parade. These parades were held in several cities all over the country in support of recruitment for America’s involvement in WWI. 1917

    Boy Scouts with flags charging up Fifth Avenue in New York City during a “Wake Up, America!” parade. These parades were held in several cities all over the country in support of recruitment for America’s involvement in WWI. 1917

  11. Photo post

    peashooter85:

Carlos Hathcock and the .50BMG
As well as using his M70 Winchest, Carlos Hathcock was also famous for pioneering the use of .50 BMG firearms as a sniper weapon.  Drawing upon the work of WWII veteran and ordinance expert Bill Brophy, Hathcock mounted a scope on an M2 Browing .50 machine with the idea of using it as a long range sniper weapon.  This makes sense since the .50 BMG has increadible power, and exceptional range and accuracy.  In 1967 Hathcock used his creation to kill two NVA soldiers at the incredible range of 2,500 yards, a record that stood until it was broken by Canadian infantryman Corporal Aaron Perry while serving in Afghanistan, 2002.
After the Vietnam War the use of the .50BMG for snipers fell by the wayside.  In the 1980’s the idea would be revived with the creation of the Barrett M82 by Ronnie Barrett.  Today .50 caliber sniper rifles are a common tool of many nations arsenals.

    peashooter85:

    Carlos Hathcock and the .50BMG

    As well as using his M70 Winchest, Carlos Hathcock was also famous for pioneering the use of .50 BMG firearms as a sniper weapon.  Drawing upon the work of WWII veteran and ordinance expert Bill Brophy, Hathcock mounted a scope on an M2 Browing .50 machine with the idea of using it as a long range sniper weapon.  This makes sense since the .50 BMG has increadible power, and exceptional range and accuracy.  In 1967 Hathcock used his creation to kill two NVA soldiers at the incredible range of 2,500 yards, a record that stood until it was broken by Canadian infantryman Corporal Aaron Perry while serving in Afghanistan, 2002.

    After the Vietnam War the use of the .50BMG for snipers fell by the wayside.  In the 1980’s the idea would be revived with the creation of the Barrett M82 by Ronnie Barrett.  Today .50 caliber sniper rifles are a common tool of many nations arsenals.

    Notes: 397 notes

    Reblogged from: peashooter85

  12. Video post

    Australian Soldier with the ‘Thousand Yard Stare’, common sign of Shell Shock, Aid Station. 1917

  13. Photo post

    "United States Marine Corps Private Theodore James Miller (February 12, 1925 - March 24, 1944) of Hennepin County, Minnesota assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Independent Regiment returns to Coast Guard-manned attack transport USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) at 1400 Hours after two days of combat on Engebi. Engebi was the first of the Eniwetok Atoll to be invaded by American forces. In Operation "Fragile" the 1st and 2nd Battalions landed on February 18, 1944, with 3rd Battalion in reserve. Opposing the landing force was Colonel Toshio Yano and the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Mobile Shipborne Brigade, which numbered 736 officers and men, including 44 personnel from the 61st Keibitai (garrison) detachment. In addition to his men’s rifles and sidearms, Yano had available two flame throwers, two 75mm mountain guns, three 20mm guns, two 120mm naval guns, two twin-mount 13mm AA machine guns, three light tanks and a variety of machine guns, mortars, and grenade dischargers. Because they themselves landed only six weeks before the American onslaught, the Japanese did not have time to prepare the kind of defenses encountered at Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Instead they prepared trenches covered with palm fronds and camouflage called "spider holes." Marines threw in smoke grenades, pinpointed the exits, and attacked with mortars, flamethrowers and explosives. In the attack on Engebi American losses were 78 killed, 166 wounded, and 7 missing, totaling 251 casualties. All of Engebi’s defenders were killed, except for nineteen prisoners taken. Miller himself was killed during the invasion of Ebon Atoll a month later, just after his 19th birthday. 25 Japanese, including six civilians (two women and two children among them), put up a 20-minute fire-fight that left Miller and another Marine dead and eight others wounded. Seventeen Japanese, including one woman, were killed. Marshallese natives brought the children to safety behind American lines. Ebon was declared secure after the Japanese radio station was destroyed and all Japanese civilians killed or captured. Ebon was abandoned by American forces on March 25, 1944. This photo, widely distributed in the United States after Miller’s death, was one of the few to openly portray the stress of combat to the American public."
worldwar2database.com

    "United States Marine Corps Private Theodore James Miller (February 12, 1925 - March 24, 1944) of Hennepin County, Minnesota assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Independent Regiment returns to Coast Guard-manned attack transport USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) at 1400 Hours after two days of combat on Engebi. Engebi was the first of the Eniwetok Atoll to be invaded by American forces. In Operation "Fragile" the 1st and 2nd Battalions landed on February 18, 1944, with 3rd Battalion in reserve. Opposing the landing force was Colonel Toshio Yano and the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Mobile Shipborne Brigade, which numbered 736 officers and men, including 44 personnel from the 61st Keibitai (garrison) detachment. In addition to his men’s rifles and sidearms, Yano had available two flame throwers, two 75mm mountain guns, three 20mm guns, two 120mm naval guns, two twin-mount 13mm AA machine guns, three light tanks and a variety of machine guns, mortars, and grenade dischargers. Because they themselves landed only six weeks before the American onslaught, the Japanese did not have time to prepare the kind of defenses encountered at Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Instead they prepared trenches covered with palm fronds and camouflage called "spider holes." Marines threw in smoke grenades, pinpointed the exits, and attacked with mortars, flamethrowers and explosives. In the attack on Engebi American losses were 78 killed, 166 wounded, and 7 missing, totaling 251 casualties. All of Engebi’s defenders were killed, except for nineteen prisoners taken. Miller himself was killed during the invasion of Ebon Atoll a month later, just after his 19th birthday. 25 Japanese, including six civilians (two women and two children among them), put up a 20-minute fire-fight that left Miller and another Marine dead and eight others wounded. Seventeen Japanese, including one woman, were killed. Marshallese natives brought the children to safety behind American lines. Ebon was declared secure after the Japanese radio station was destroyed and all Japanese civilians killed or captured. Ebon was abandoned by American forces on March 25, 1944. This photo, widely distributed in the United States after Miller’s death, was one of the few to openly portray the stress of combat to the American public."
    worldwar2database.com

  14. Photo post

    militarymom:

God Bless Our Troops!

    militarymom:

    God Bless Our Troops!

    Notes: 766 notes

    Reblogged from: militarymom

  15. Video post

    Thousand Yard Stare

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