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  1. Photo post

    peashooter85:

Carlos Hathcock and the .50BMG
As well as using his M70 Winchest, Carlos Hathcock was also famous for pioneering the use of .50 BMG firearms as a sniper weapon.  Drawing upon the work of WWII veteran and ordinance expert Bill Brophy, Hathcock mounted a scope on an M2 Browing .50 machine with the idea of using it as a long range sniper weapon.  This makes sense since the .50 BMG has increadible power, and exceptional range and accuracy.  In 1967 Hathcock used his creation to kill two NVA soldiers at the incredible range of 2,500 yards, a record that stood until it was broken by Canadian infantryman Corporal Aaron Perry while serving in Afghanistan, 2002.
After the Vietnam War the use of the .50BMG for snipers fell by the wayside.  In the 1980’s the idea would be revived with the creation of the Barrett M82 by Ronnie Barrett.  Today .50 caliber sniper rifles are a common tool of many nations arsenals.

    peashooter85:

    Carlos Hathcock and the .50BMG

    As well as using his M70 Winchest, Carlos Hathcock was also famous for pioneering the use of .50 BMG firearms as a sniper weapon.  Drawing upon the work of WWII veteran and ordinance expert Bill Brophy, Hathcock mounted a scope on an M2 Browing .50 machine with the idea of using it as a long range sniper weapon.  This makes sense since the .50 BMG has increadible power, and exceptional range and accuracy.  In 1967 Hathcock used his creation to kill two NVA soldiers at the incredible range of 2,500 yards, a record that stood until it was broken by Canadian infantryman Corporal Aaron Perry while serving in Afghanistan, 2002.

    After the Vietnam War the use of the .50BMG for snipers fell by the wayside.  In the 1980’s the idea would be revived with the creation of the Barrett M82 by Ronnie Barrett.  Today .50 caliber sniper rifles are a common tool of many nations arsenals.

    Notes: 398 notes

    Reblogged from: peashooter85

  2. Video post

    Australian Soldier with the ‘Thousand Yard Stare’, common sign of Shell Shock, Aid Station. 1917

  3. Photo post

    "United States Marine Corps Private Theodore James Miller (February 12, 1925 - March 24, 1944) of Hennepin County, Minnesota assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Independent Regiment returns to Coast Guard-manned attack transport USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) at 1400 Hours after two days of combat on Engebi. Engebi was the first of the Eniwetok Atoll to be invaded by American forces. In Operation "Fragile" the 1st and 2nd Battalions landed on February 18, 1944, with 3rd Battalion in reserve. Opposing the landing force was Colonel Toshio Yano and the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Mobile Shipborne Brigade, which numbered 736 officers and men, including 44 personnel from the 61st Keibitai (garrison) detachment. In addition to his men’s rifles and sidearms, Yano had available two flame throwers, two 75mm mountain guns, three 20mm guns, two 120mm naval guns, two twin-mount 13mm AA machine guns, three light tanks and a variety of machine guns, mortars, and grenade dischargers. Because they themselves landed only six weeks before the American onslaught, the Japanese did not have time to prepare the kind of defenses encountered at Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Instead they prepared trenches covered with palm fronds and camouflage called "spider holes." Marines threw in smoke grenades, pinpointed the exits, and attacked with mortars, flamethrowers and explosives. In the attack on Engebi American losses were 78 killed, 166 wounded, and 7 missing, totaling 251 casualties. All of Engebi’s defenders were killed, except for nineteen prisoners taken. Miller himself was killed during the invasion of Ebon Atoll a month later, just after his 19th birthday. 25 Japanese, including six civilians (two women and two children among them), put up a 20-minute fire-fight that left Miller and another Marine dead and eight others wounded. Seventeen Japanese, including one woman, were killed. Marshallese natives brought the children to safety behind American lines. Ebon was declared secure after the Japanese radio station was destroyed and all Japanese civilians killed or captured. Ebon was abandoned by American forces on March 25, 1944. This photo, widely distributed in the United States after Miller’s death, was one of the few to openly portray the stress of combat to the American public."
worldwar2database.com

    "United States Marine Corps Private Theodore James Miller (February 12, 1925 - March 24, 1944) of Hennepin County, Minnesota assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Independent Regiment returns to Coast Guard-manned attack transport USS Arthur Middleton (APA-25) at 1400 Hours after two days of combat on Engebi. Engebi was the first of the Eniwetok Atoll to be invaded by American forces. In Operation "Fragile" the 1st and 2nd Battalions landed on February 18, 1944, with 3rd Battalion in reserve. Opposing the landing force was Colonel Toshio Yano and the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Mobile Shipborne Brigade, which numbered 736 officers and men, including 44 personnel from the 61st Keibitai (garrison) detachment. In addition to his men’s rifles and sidearms, Yano had available two flame throwers, two 75mm mountain guns, three 20mm guns, two 120mm naval guns, two twin-mount 13mm AA machine guns, three light tanks and a variety of machine guns, mortars, and grenade dischargers. Because they themselves landed only six weeks before the American onslaught, the Japanese did not have time to prepare the kind of defenses encountered at Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Instead they prepared trenches covered with palm fronds and camouflage called "spider holes." Marines threw in smoke grenades, pinpointed the exits, and attacked with mortars, flamethrowers and explosives. In the attack on Engebi American losses were 78 killed, 166 wounded, and 7 missing, totaling 251 casualties. All of Engebi’s defenders were killed, except for nineteen prisoners taken. Miller himself was killed during the invasion of Ebon Atoll a month later, just after his 19th birthday. 25 Japanese, including six civilians (two women and two children among them), put up a 20-minute fire-fight that left Miller and another Marine dead and eight others wounded. Seventeen Japanese, including one woman, were killed. Marshallese natives brought the children to safety behind American lines. Ebon was declared secure after the Japanese radio station was destroyed and all Japanese civilians killed or captured. Ebon was abandoned by American forces on March 25, 1944. This photo, widely distributed in the United States after Miller’s death, was one of the few to openly portray the stress of combat to the American public."
    worldwar2database.com

  4. Photo post

    militarymom:

God Bless Our Troops!

    militarymom:

    God Bless Our Troops!

    Notes: 773 notes

    Reblogged from: militarymom

  5. Video post

    Thousand Yard Stare

  6. Photo post

    peerintothepast:

Pfc Clark Richie sniffs the scent of a letter from a girl back home in Jay, Oklahoma. April 1966.

    peerintothepast:

    Pfc Clark Richie sniffs the scent of a letter from a girl back home in Jay, Oklahoma. April 1966.

    Notes: 181 notes

    Reblogged from: peerintothepast

  7. Photo post

    U.S. Soldiers at an ice cream stand in front of Notre Dame, Paris. August 1945

    U.S. Soldiers at an ice cream stand in front of Notre Dame, Paris. August 1945

  8. Photo post

    American soldiers march up the Appian Way during the drive towards Rome. 1944
time.life.com

    American soldiers march up the Appian Way during the drive towards Rome. 1944
    time.life.com

  9. Photo post

    An American soldier on a meal break during the drive towards Rome, 1944.  By Carl Mydans forTime & Life Pictures/Getty Images

    An American soldier on a meal break during the drive towards Rome, 1944. By Carl Mydans forTime & Life Pictures/Getty Images

  10. Photo post

    American troops rest in a courtyard during the drive towards Rome, World War II. By Carl Mydan for Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images.

    American troops rest in a courtyard during the drive towards Rome, World War II. By Carl Mydan for Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images.

  11. Video post

    peerintothepast:

    One of the most beautiful libraries in the country was the Public Library of Cincinnati. It opened in 1874 and was demolished in 1955.

    Notes: 1,054 notes

    Reblogged from: peerintothepast

  12. Photo post

    Pfc Milton L. Cook ready to fire his M-60 into a wooded area from which sniper fire had been received, 10 miles northeast of Cu Chi, Vietnam. He was a member of the 25th Infantry Division. April 17, 1967.
militaryphotos.net

    Pfc Milton L. Cook ready to fire his M-60 into a wooded area from which sniper fire had been received, 10 miles northeast of Cu Chi, Vietnam. He was a member of the 25th Infantry Division. April 17, 1967.
    militaryphotos.net

  13. Photo post

    The first American soldiers enter Troina, Italy. 1943 By Robert Capa

    The first American soldiers enter Troina, Italy. 1943 By Robert Capa

  14. Photo post

    American paratrooper, 1945 by Robert Capa.
    American paratrooper, 1945 by Robert Capa.

    Notes: 283 notes

    Reblogged from: demons

  15. Photo post

    Alvin C. York Bridge across the Tennessee River, opening day. July 5, 1930.

    Alvin C. York Bridge across the Tennessee River, opening day. July 5, 1930.

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