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  1. Photo post

    U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gregory “Pappy” Boyington and his squadron shoot down eight Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zeros. Shot down and captured in 1944, Boyington is first awarded the Navy Cross, and later the Medal of Honor for this day’s action as well as his overall leadership throughout his time with VMF-214 the ‘Black Sheep’. Oct 17, 1943

    U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gregory “Pappy” Boyington and his squadron shoot down eight Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zeros. Shot down and captured in 1944, Boyington is first awarded the Navy Cross, and later the Medal of Honor for this day’s action as well as his overall leadership throughout his time with VMF-214 the ‘Black Sheep’. Oct 17, 1943

  2. Photo post

    "If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music."  ~Albert Einstein

    "If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music." ~Albert Einstein

  3. Photo post

    Snowstorm in New York City, 1947. Photo by Al Fenn

    Snowstorm in New York City, 1947. Photo by Al Fenn

  4. Photo post

    B-17 Flying Fortress, Tail gunner’s position. By Vern Snow on Flickr

    B-17 Flying Fortress, Tail gunner’s position. By Vern Snow on Flickr

  5. Photo post

    A Douglas C-47 Skytrain flying over the Pyramids, Cairo. ca 1943.

    A Douglas C-47 Skytrain flying over the Pyramids, Cairo. ca 1943.

  6. Photo post

    Consolidated B-24J-150-CO Liberator 44-40210 854th BS, 491st BG, 8th AF Hit by light-flak on the September 18,1944 low-level supply drop mission for the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions in the area of Eindhoven, Holland. The plane was badly hit in the right wing and the pilot, Capt. James K. Hunter, decided to belly her into a field, but lost the #3 engine at an altitude of 50 ft, causing the right wing to dip low enough to touch the ground.” Source: D. Sheley on Flickr

    Consolidated B-24J-150-CO Liberator 44-40210 854th BS, 491st BG, 8th AF Hit by light-flak on the September 18,1944 low-level supply drop mission for the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions in the area of Eindhoven, Holland. The plane was badly hit in the right wing and the pilot, Capt. James K. Hunter, decided to belly her into a field, but lost the #3 engine at an altitude of 50 ft, causing the right wing to dip low enough to touch the ground.” Source: D. Sheley on Flickr

  7. Photo post

    Aboard the USS Block Island (CVE 106), a Marine ordnance man works on the .50 cal machine guns of a Vought F4U “Corsair” on one of the ship’s elevators during operations off Okinawa - 5 June 1945 (USMC photo)

    Aboard the USS Block Island (CVE 106), a Marine ordnance man works on the .50 cal machine guns of a Vought F4U “Corsair” on one of the ship’s elevators during operations off Okinawa - 5 June 1945 (USMC photo)

  8. Photo post

    historicaltimes:

A Douglas DC-3 of BOAC, silhouetted by searchlights on the Rock of Gibraltar, 1940-1945

    historicaltimes:

    A Douglas DC-3 of BOAC, silhouetted by searchlights on the Rock of Gibraltar, 1940-1945

    Notes: 353 notes

    Reblogged from: historicaltimes

  9. Photo post

    "WINDOW ROCK, ARIZONA — The Navajo Nation mourns the loss of another warrior. On July 20, former Navajo Nation Code Talker Edward B. Anderson passed at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 89 years old. “The Navajo Nation sends our deepest condolences and prayers to the family during this time of mourning,” said Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly. “WE LOST A TRUE ROLE MODEL TO OUR NAVAJO PEOPLE. THE NAVAJO CODE TALKERS SAVED OUR COUNTRY FROM WAR THROUGH THE USE OF OUR LANGUAGE AND DEMONSTRATED THE POWER OF DINE’ BIZAAD IN THE PROCESS. HE WILL TRULY BE MISSED,” SAID PRESIDENT SHELLY.

Anderson was born and raised on the Navajo Nation and was a lifelong Arizona resident.

Born in St. Michaels to Josephine Gatewood and Edward B. Anderson Sr. of Sawmill, he was of the Honaghaahnii (One Who Walks Around) Clan and born to the Todich’ii’nii (Bitter Water) Clan.

Anderson enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the age of 18 and served from 1942 to 1945, when he was honorably discharged.

A member of the 1st Marine Division, Anderson was stationed in the South Pacific and Australia. He saw combat at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and New Britain.

He was wounded in battle and was a recipient of the Purple Heart, South Pacific Ribbons and the Congressional Silver Medal.” nativenewsonline.net #usmc #marinecorps #marines #ww2 #wwii #navajo #codetalkers #heroes #warriors #honorthem #purpleheart #supportourtroops #supportourveterans #RIP #semperfi 🇺🇸

    "WINDOW ROCK, ARIZONA — The Navajo Nation mourns the loss of another warrior. On July 20, former Navajo Nation Code Talker Edward B. Anderson passed at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 89 years old. “The Navajo Nation sends our deepest condolences and prayers to the family during this time of mourning,” said Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly. “WE LOST A TRUE ROLE MODEL TO OUR NAVAJO PEOPLE. THE NAVAJO CODE TALKERS SAVED OUR COUNTRY FROM WAR THROUGH THE USE OF OUR LANGUAGE AND DEMONSTRATED THE POWER OF DINE’ BIZAAD IN THE PROCESS. HE WILL TRULY BE MISSED,” SAID PRESIDENT SHELLY.

    Anderson was born and raised on the Navajo Nation and was a lifelong Arizona resident.

    Born in St. Michaels to Josephine Gatewood and Edward B. Anderson Sr. of Sawmill, he was of the Honaghaahnii (One Who Walks Around) Clan and born to the Todich’ii’nii (Bitter Water) Clan.

    Anderson enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the age of 18 and served from 1942 to 1945, when he was honorably discharged.

    A member of the 1st Marine Division, Anderson was stationed in the South Pacific and Australia. He saw combat at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and New Britain.

    He was wounded in battle and was a recipient of the Purple Heart, South Pacific Ribbons and the Congressional Silver Medal.” nativenewsonline.net #usmc #marinecorps #marines #ww2 #wwii #navajo #codetalkers #heroes #warriors #honorthem #purpleheart #supportourtroops #supportourveterans #RIP #semperfi 🇺🇸

  10. Photo post

    "An underwater photo of a U.S. DD Sherman lying off Omaha beach. The DD Shermans were a modification of the classic Sherman tank to allow them to swim. They were fitted with twin propellers for propulsion while afloat and had a canvas floatation screen fitted to the hull. The intention was to launch the tanks which would swim ashore and be able to provide close support to the troops in the first wave. Unfortunately on D-Day the waves were too high and many DDs destined for Omaha were swamped and sank while still well off shore. On other beaches the commanders realised the danger and brought their DDs much closer inshore before launching allowing them to reach the shore." naval-technology.com

    "An underwater photo of a U.S. DD Sherman lying off Omaha beach. The DD Shermans were a modification of the classic Sherman tank to allow them to swim. They were fitted with twin propellers for propulsion while afloat and had a canvas floatation screen fitted to the hull. The intention was to launch the tanks which would swim ashore and be able to provide close support to the troops in the first wave. Unfortunately on D-Day the waves were too high and many DDs destined for Omaha were swamped and sank while still well off shore. On other beaches the commanders realised the danger and brought their DDs much closer inshore before launching allowing them to reach the shore." naval-technology.com

  11. Photo post

    U.S. Marines in Vietnam by Larry Burrows 1966
life.time.com

    U.S. Marines in Vietnam by Larry Burrows 1966
    life.time.com

  12. Photo post

    peerintothepast:

Wally’s barber shop on St Martin Street has defiant signs outside after losing its windows during the London blitz. 21st Nov 1940

    peerintothepast:

    Wally’s barber shop on St Martin Street has defiant signs outside after losing its windows during the London blitz. 21st Nov 1940

    Notes: 1,011 notes

    Reblogged from: peerintothepast

  13. Video post

    #USMC Sgt. Major Thomas B. Crump, who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor while serving with the Marines, died Tuesday, July 8, 2014. He was 93 years old.

    The ninth of 10 children, Crump grew up in a poor family in Lee County, Miss.
    When he was 7, his father died and the family lost their cotton farm. Some of the children were sent to live with neighbors; Crump and two of his siblings lived in a widows home where their mother worked.

    In 1940, he saw a man in a striking uniform and asked him where he got it.
    Thats how Crump came to be a Marine. After training in San Diego, he was sent to Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, where he was assigned to work for naval intelligence, guarding the dry docks. On Dec. 7, he started work at 4 a.m. The first bomb fell at 7:55.

    He was on guard duty alongside the USS Pennsylvania, standing on a dock when he was knocked to the ground.

    Almost immediately he began to return fire. He later proudly told friends, he was one of the first. “It was the most traumatic thing I have ever witnessed in my life. I was absolutely scared to death,” Crump said. “When you see bodies blown apart and bodies on fire during a situation like that, it stays in your gut for the rest of your life.”

    Crump also fought in the battles of Bougainville, Pelileu and Okinawa. In 1953, Crump returned to combat in Korea. In 1964, Crump was sent to Louisville to serve as a recruiter for the Marine Corps.

    Sgt. Maj. Crump retired from the Marines in 1970 but continued to be involved with the JROTC program he started at Seneca High School, the longest running program of its kind. He was a veteran of three wars. He served in the Marines for 30 years.

    Sgt. Major Crump died at Oaklawn Nursing and Rehab Center surrounded by a group of Marines. Those men helped organize his visitation and funeral, ensuring Crump would receive full military honors.

    On Friday, July 11, 2014, dozens of retired Marines, wearing red jackets and white dress gloves, filed in one by one to salute Crump.

    He was laid out wearing his full dress uniform. A baseball ball cap reading “Pearl Harbor Survivor” was placed above his shoulder. As those Marines stood at attention, Crump was awarded a recognition medal that was placed above his heart.

    "Just to be able to say he’s my friend, my personal friend is an honor. Truly he’s an American hero," said CJ Wychulis, who is also a retired marine.

    "He talked about when the Japanese were flying in dropping bombs. Of course it was nothing but panic. All the stuff in the water, he was trying to help people," Wychulis remembered Crump telling him.

    "He never considered himself a hero, all the other veterans were heroes," he added. He spoke of his Marine Corps service with passion, eloquence and humility.

    Crump was laid to rest Saturday, July 12, 2014 at Calvary Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky.

  14. Photo post

    A stretcher-case being carried back along a duck board track through a wilderness of mud and shell-holes near Ypres. 15th February 1918. (IWM. Colourised by Doug Banks)

    A stretcher-case being carried back along a duck board track through a wilderness of mud and shell-holes near Ypres. 15th February 1918. (IWM. Colourised by Doug Banks)

  15. Video post

    "I’m actually writing history. It isn’t what you’d call big history. I don’t write about presidents and generals… I write about the man who was ranching, the man who was mining, the man who was opening up the country." ~Louis L’Amour

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